D.M. Lane – Philadelphia, PA

In January 1883, The Carriage Monthly published the the following obituary for Captain D.M. Lane:

Lane's Extension-Top Sociable, as Exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial. Published in The Hub, February 1877.

Extension-Top Sociable by D.M. Lane & Son, as Exhibited at the Philadelphia Centennial. Published in The Hub, February 1877.

“At the age of 16 years he apprenticed himself as a blacksmith to his two brothers, then carrying on the carriage business in Delaware County, Pa., under the name of E. Lane & Co., who, in 1846, removed to Philadelphia and opened the first carriage factory west of the Schuylkill. In 1850, he with a brother purchased the business of his two brothers which he continued but a short time, when the brother died. The same year his brother John became associated with him, and in 1852 removed to 502 Market Street, and opened a repository at 1907 same street; the following year they again removed their factory to a large building erected back of their salesrooms. In 1856, Mr. Lane withdrew from the firm and commenced the business in Chester, Pa., where he remained until August, 1857, when he sold out and removed to St. Louis, intending to open a factory there; the outlook being bad he returned to Philadelphia and re-opened the factory at 3406 Market Street. In 1861, during the late war, and while still carrying on at this place, he raised a company of 100 men, and was made captain of company B, 29th Pennsylvania Volunteers. His business requiring his attention, he resigned September 19th, 1862, two days after the battle of Antietam, and returned home, and afterwards served over two years as provost marshall of the fourth district. In 1867, the large three-story brick, 80 by 105 feet, was erected on the present site, 3432 Market Street.

Millard F. Lane, of Philadelphia, Pa.

Millard F. Lane, of Philadelphia, Pa.

In 1874, he took Mr. Millard F. Lane, his son, into partnership with him, when they continued adding to their works until now the crowning of all was the erection of another large three story brick building in connection with the others, and an elegant repository on Chestnut Street, thus giving them sufficient room to meet the demands of their growing trade. The had completed their idea of a model factory and were beginning to enjoy its advantages when this sudden dead robbed them of a father and a business companion. The carriage trade and the Captain’s many friends in the fraternity, extend their sympathies to the bereaved family.”

Break Designed and Built by D.M. Lane's Sons, as published in The Carriage Monthly, October 1887. This vehicle was exhibited in the Constitutional Centennial Parade in 1886

Break Designed and Built by D.M. Lane’s Sons, as published in The Carriage Monthly, October 1887. This vehicle was exhibited in the Constitutional Centennial Parade in 1886

After the death of Captain D.M. Lane, his sons M.F. Lane and D.M. Lane formed a new partnership, under the name D.M. Lane’s Sons. They opened a new repository in 1887 on Chestnut Street, but most of their business continued to take place at the existing factory and warehouse at Thirty-fifth and Market Streets. According to The Carriage Monthly, the establishment is recognized by fashionable purchasers of carriages as producing the highest class of carriages of the most correct style, and its wareroom are always sought for the latest novelties” (November 1893). According to a biography published in The Hub in October 1884, M.F. Lane was respected as a member of “the younger progressive element of the carriage trade.” He eventually rose to the position of President of the Carriage Builders’ National Association. Upon Millard Lane’s death in 1899, D. Martin Lane became the head of the establishment.