J.M. Quinby & Company – Newark, New Jersey

The firm of J.M. Quinby & Co. originated in 1834, when Quinby took over the factory of G. and A.K. Cartir after their failure. The firm was founded under his name, with the “& Co.” added in 1848 following Quinby’s association with Geo. M. Spencer and A.R. Ball. Quinby had a number of associates over the years, with Isaac Young buying out Ball’s interest in 1857 and Nelson Wright taking Spencer’s place in 1859. Following Quinby’s death in 1874, the firm was reorganized by Quinby’s son, of the same name, Isaac S. Ayres, and John H. Jephson.

A vehicle for conveying passengers around Central Park for a small fare. The style was developed by Quinby but also used in other parks throughout various cities.

A vehicle for conveying passengers around Central Park for a small fare. The style was developed by Quinby but also used in other parks throughout various cities. Published in The Hub, September 1878.

In 1885, The Carriage Monthly reprinted the following article from the Newark Morning Register: 

“Messrs. J.M. Quinby & Co., the well-known carriage-makers of No. 836 Broad Street, the past year commemorated the fiftieth anniversary of the foundation of their business. The founding of the factory, however, dates back to a somewhat earlier period, as it has been known as a coach factory for a period of fifty-eight years, being founded by Messrs. G. & A.K. Carter in 1826 … Early in their history the superior quality of carriages manufactured by Messrs. J.M. Quinby & Co. secured for them a wide celebrity and an extensive trade throughout the South, which increased in extent every year until 1861, when the breaking out of the war interrupted it completely. Before the war the wealthy Southern planters and merchants, as is well known, lived luxuriously, and the carriages that Messrs. J.M. Quinby & Co. furnished them were of the best quality and most elaborately finished … the great majority of fine carriages turned out by J.M. Quinby & Co. were shipped to the South up to the breaking out of the war. This event having put an end to all manufacturing business for a time, the firm at once turned their attention to making baggage wagons, ambulances and gun carriages, for the supply of which they took large contracts from the government, and they received from the War Department, as well as from officers in the field, the gratifying testimony that their work was rated among the most satisfactory and durable that had been done for the United States in their line. After the panic of 1873, when business had revived, the present management of the firm of J.M. Quinby & Co. equipped their factory with every approved improvement to aid them in keeping fully abreast of the times, and to enable them to both please and satisfy the most exacting and refined tastes in the fashion and finish of their productions. The various building comprising the factory cover a space of valuable ground in the heart of the city, 65 by 550 feet in dimension, all being three-story brick structures. The factory is equipped with steam-power and is heated by steam throughout every department. From 100 to 120 skilled mechanics find steady employment, which gives the factory a productive capacity of about 300 vehicles a year; and in addition they annually repair from 450 to 500 fine carriages … All varieties of vehicles are manufactured, ranging from the light phaeton to the heavy, respectable family coach, and all of finished in the highest style of the carriage-maker’s art. In the manufacture of their carriages they hot only use the very best material, but every detail is carefully studied out and the comfort and convenience of customers made leading features, gracefulness of design and strength and durability being especially sought after. ”

Quinby & Co. claimed this design "has met with special favor on the part of their customers." Published in The Hub, February 1884.

Quinby & Co. claimed this design “has met with special favor on the part of their customers.” Published in The Hub, February 1884.

In later years, J.M. Quinby & Co. would be headed by William W. Ogden, who also served as President of the Carriage Builder’s National Association in 1904. J.M. Quinby & Co. was still in business in 1911 at 27 Division Street, Newark, making carriages and automobile bodies.