Four Wheeled Vehicles - Single Seat

Buckboard: A simply constructed vehicle of American origin, it is thought to have been developed in the first third of the 19th Century.  It was very popular in the West and the mountainous regions of the East.  A true Buckboard is a four wheeled vehicle with a floor made of one or several planks of some springy wood such as Ash, about one inch thick, attached directly to the axles.  The seat is near the center on risers.  The springing action of the wood board(s) was a substitute for steel springs and was said to be of equal comfort over rough roads.

 














 

Buckboard

Buggy:  These four wheeled vehicles were extremely popular, economical and versatile. They were available in a number of different body styles, hung on side bar or end springs. They were also produced with a cut under option.  Buggies without tops are also known as Road Wagons or Runabouts.

Coal Box Buggy: The body on this buggy is cut down in the front and back.  It derives its name from its resemblance to a grocer’s coal box.


















 

Coal Box Buggy

Concord Buggy (or wagon):  A shallow body, straight or slightly curved, mounted on Concord gear consisting of three reaches and steel side springs.

















Concord Buggy


 


 


Corning Buggy:
  A form between the Coal Box and Piano Box Buggy, shown here as a cut-under.  First built by Brewster and Co. in 1875 and sold to Erastus Corning of Albany NY.
















Corning Buggy







Goddard Buggy:
 
Popular drop front buggy designed by Thomas Goddard.















Goddard Buggy


 





Square Box Buggy:
 The most common variety of Buggy, the name is self descriptive.  It eventually became synonymous with the Piano Box Buggy, although the latter has rounded corners.

 























End-Spring Square-Box Buggy




Skeleton Wagon:
 A very light-weight, four wheeled trotting wagon intended for track use.

















Sidebar Square-Box Buggy


 

Queen's Body Phaeton


 

Queen’s Body Phaeton:  A lady’s pleasure driving vehicle characterized by its graceful curved bottom line.  Shown here with a basket body.
















Skeleton Wagon



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